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crampfix Archives - Crampfix

Your How-To CrampFix Guide for Ironman

CrampFix Triathlon

Our Ambassador Rod Miller Ironman 70.3 Geelong

If you can complete an Ironman without one single cramp, congratulations because you must have some type of super power! For majority of athletes competing in an Ironman, cramping is a real problem that can hit you like a brick and really throw you off your game. To help give you an idea on how to use CrampFix during your race to keep you ahead of your cramps, we have put together a short guide on how to use CrampFix in an Ironman race.

Our first tip is that if you know that you have a tendency to cramp at certain times, we recommended that you have a shot of CrampFix a few kilometres before you reach that distance or time to use as a preventative. A lot of athletes prefer to carry our QuickFix Shots and will usually have a shot at around the 60-80km mark.

The major turning point for athletes cramping is at the beginning of their run. We recommend that you store your CrampFix in your T2 bag and have a shot during transition. You could also drink one shot just before getting off you bike – whatever is most convenient and easy for you.

If possible, try to carry a minimum of 3 shots or 1 bottle during your run. To avoid cramping, top up with a 10-15ml shot of CrampFix every 40 minutes or when you feel like a cramp is coming on.

Don’t forget to stay hydrated and to keep your minerals and nutrients up to help get you through the race. Cramping is most commonly caused by a lack of hydration, lack of minerals and salt, lactic acid, or a combination of all three. At the time of a cramp, salt and magnesium tablets won’t give you relief for about 15-20 minutes. Carrying a shot of CrampFix is the fastest way to get rid of a cramp and help get you back on your game.

 

We will be at Noosa Triathlon November 3, 2019

Come say hello and stock up on your favourite cramp management product!

 

Check out how our ambassador Rod Miller stayed cramp free and made a 5 minute PB!

“Due to the coldness of the water in Geelong which is well under the temp that I am use to living in Cairns, I took my first Raspberry Shot just before the swim leg. Piece of mind for me knowing I will not have any cramping issues while swimming in cooler waters. Result = 5 min PB for the swim leg!!! 

On the bike leg I had my second Lemon Shot around the 60km mark which I use to help me refocus thanks to that lemon flavour and stay strong and cramp free with some long hills coming up. 

Feeling good coming on to the run leg with some short little hills at either end of this two lap course. At the 8km mark was my next and most favourite shot, Espresso Shot 🖤 with 7mg of caffeine gives me that little kick to keep focused towards the finish line

Overall a new PB and another Cramp FREE race thanks to CrampFix!”

 

Save money, get any 6 Shots for $25!

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Q & A with Caleb Noble – Professional Triathlete & Ironman

Caleb Noble Noosa Triathlon Winner

Starting triathletes at the age of 15, Caleb Noble has found himself competing professionally around the world by the age of 24. For a few years he has been competing in elite ITU races and has only just started racing professionally in Ironman and Ironman 70.3 events.  Caleb has been an avid user and ambassador of CrampFix for almost 18 months and has since recently won the Runaway Noosa Marathon and had the opportunity to race in Challenge Almere in Amsterdam.

How did your triathlete journey begin?

C:  I grew up in a small country town (Ganmain) close to Wagga Wagga NSW and grew up around Aussie rules. I found triathlons when I was 15 doing the NSW all schools triathlon and from there moved onto ITU racing and then onto long course triathlons.

What does your training schedule look like?

C: I try to train for roughly 20-25 hours on a good week. On a bad week, maybe a little bit less depending on how much time I have. I try to do as much as I can, but I also work full time landscaping so I try to find the right balance.

What does your diet consist of before, during and after a race?

C:  I make sure I get my carbs in pre race and make sure I’m very well hydrated.

During the race I’m just trying to focus on getting my electrolytes and carbs in to sustain me for the duration of the race.

Post race I have a few drinks with mates and a good meal.

How do you use CrampFix in training and for an event?

C: I use CrampFix throughout my training pretty often. I make sure I’m taking it every hour and keep on top of it so no cramps come on.

What races do you have coming up this year?

C:  I’ll be racing the Noosa Triathlon up next in November. Then I will race Ironman 70.3 Western Sydney in November and I haven’t planned December yet.

What was your biggest learning curve?

C: Learning to adapt to the training load leading into a big event and to really rest and freshen up in taper week.

What is your greatest piece of advice?

C:  Train smart, not hard. You are better to go into a run slightly underdone then to over do it and burn out and over train.

 

If you want to follow Caleb’s journey, you can find him on Instagram @calebnoble95

 

We can’t wait to be there to support Caleb and everyone racing at Noosa Triathlon on November 3.

Keep your eyes out for CrampFix if you’re there and come say hello! We will have free samples and products to buy to help get you through the race

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It’s Never Too Late to Join the Running Game! Interview with Andrew Chau – Marathon Runner

Here at CrampFix, we want to inspire you with some of our amazing ambassadors in a new series of interviews to delve deeper into their sports and personal experiences. We hope that you will be able to learn something new or to connect with like minded people and to grow the CrampFix community!

Andrew Chau Marathon Runner

Andrew Chau @and_he_runs

The first running race that mattered to Andrew Chau was the Half Marathon in 2016. He had completed other fun runs like the Mother’s Day Classic earlier, but he had never dedicated 4 months of training to a specific event. After the Half Marathon, he completed the Blackmores Sydney Marathon that same year.

Since then, he has completed 8 Half Marathons, 7 Marathons, and 3 Trail Races, including the 45km Six Foot Track Marathon. Andrew has also completed a couple dozen shorter distance races that were less than the half marathon like City 2 Surf and the Sydney Harbour 10km.

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

A: I’m late to the running game. I’ve never considered myself as a runner and I never imagined myself to run 30km most Sundays and race 4 marathons a year. I grew up as a swimmer, then became a cyclist, a skier, and now a runner.

I pass the time between my running by working full-time as a Landscape Architect, designing playgrounds and parks at Waverley Council. One of my current projects in construction are the fitness stations along the Coastal Walk between Tamarama Beach and Marks Park.

I have a Wife and two fur-children, a Kelpie and a Staffador, they keep us busy and occasionally join us on runs.

How did your running journey begin?

A: Before 2016 I’ve always avoided running – the most running I would do would be the occasional sprint for the train or tram. My sister for the previous decade would always try and entice me to run a marathon, and my response was always the same – they invented bikes for a reason.

In 2016, I finally folded, with my partner (now wife) hopping on the running advocacy band wagon, we all signed up for the Gold Coast Asics Half Marathon. I used the Asics online training plan to get me started, because I had no idea of how to train properly for longer distances. Even after completing the first Half and gearing up for the Blackmores Sydney Marathon, I still believed I was only running to keep myself ski fit over summer.

What races do you have coming up this year?

A: I’m working towards my ‘A’ race, Melbourne Marathon. I bombed out my other race earlier in the year so this will hopefully be the redeemer. Following that I was lucky enough to secure an entry into the New York City Marathon, it will be my first World Major marathon. These races are only 4 weeks apart, so it will be interesting to see how my body holds up.

What is your motivation for running

A: I run because I want to know what my best can be. I also run to support other people achieve their goals and realise their potential – a fair few of the races I’ve completed have been as an official pacer, running down the finish chute and pushing others to finish strong is an amazing feeling, especially when those people go beyond what they had believed they were capable.

What does your training schedule look like?

A:  I integrate a lot of run commutes into my schedule, it kills two birds with one stone, I get to work, and I get my run done, in basically the same time it might take to catch a train. A normal week consists of 90 – 100km of running, made up of two interval sessions, a tempo session, a midweek long run 20km, a 10km tempo and parkrun on Saturday, and Sunday long run 30-35km. On top of this there would be at least one gym session, lots of foam rolling, and about 60-75km of bike commuting.

Do you have any rituals that you swear by before you compete in a race? If so, what?

A: I don’t have any weird rituals, no lucky charms, just a bagel with peanut butter, jam, and a banana, washed down with a coffee, double shot long black from my freshly ground Sample coffee.

Before racing a marathon, I like to get in 2-3km warm-up with some speed build up – before my PB marathon in Sydney last year, I ran almost 4km. Before my 10km PB, I ran 17km!

What was your favourite course/event you have ever done?

A: Adidas Paris 10km. The atmosphere was absolutely amazing! It is the biggest 10km event in France where you sign-up and represent a neighbourhood, you have whole cheer squads for a particular neighbourhood and the noise when you run past is next level! Ale Ale Ale! ODEON! BASTILLE! ODEON! Not only were the crowds amazing, imaging running full speed towards the Eiffel Tower!

What was your biggest learning curve?

A: Train slow to get fast. It isn’t always the best to train hard all the time. Your body needs to time to recover, and the gains from a quality workout will only occur if your body learns to adapt during that recovery. Training hard all the time just causes your body to fatigue, break down, and heighten the risk of injury.

What is your greatest piece of advice

A: Forget about times, race because you want to be there, race because you want the experience. If you’re constantly chasing times you lose focus of why you are there and you place extra pressure and stress on yourself to perform. You will lose the love of running.

 

If you want to follow Andrew’s journey, you can find him on Instagram @and_he_runs.

 

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The Best 5 Tips to Prepare for a Marathon

With the last few marathons coming up before the end of year and all the time and effort you have put in to your training, you should do everything you can to prepare for your marathon and maximise your race. Here are five tips to make sure you are ready for your big race.

via https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/664210645020832706/

Let your Body Rest

Be kind to your body and listen to what it needs; after all, it’s the only thing that will get you over the finish line. Have a rest day before your race and don’t push yourself. If you feel like you need to do some sort of exercise the day before a race, stick to a very slow, short jog or a small walk to stretch your legs. You could even use this as an excuse to treat yourself and to get a relaxing massage! You have trained so hard for this event and having one day off will not impact your fitness.

Make sure you also get plenty of sleep in the lead up to the event. Depriving your body from sleep will not give it the time it needs to recover, leaving you feeling fatigued and unfocused. Fortunately, if you didn’t manage to get the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep the night before, the adrenaline usually overrides your symptoms and has shown that it is unlikely to effect your performance.

Increase your Carb Intake

To help prepare your body for a marathon, you should start to increase your daily carbohydrate intake a few days before your event. Eating complex carbs whilst you’re training for a marathon will increase your glycogen supply, which will assist you to improve your performance on the day of the race.

Try not to go to overboard with carbs the night before though, you don’t want your body to feel sluggish overeating food that it’s not used to. Eating a well balanced diet and slowly increasing your carbs is key so that it is not a big shock to the body. Make sure you stick to what you know and what makes you feel good.

Stay Hydrated

Staying hydrated can’t be stressed enough in the lead up to a marathon! Make sure to drink plenty of water a few days before the big event, especially the day before to prepare for your marathon. Try not to drink excessively though, you just want to stay well-hydrated so you can just top up in the morning before the race.

Get Organised

Write a list of everything you need and lay it all out ticking it off as you go. Make sure to lay out what you’re wearing; socks, shoes, sunscreen, Vaseline or specialised cream to prevent any rubbing or chafing, and anything else you think is important. Don’t forget to bring your shots of CrampFix to avoid cramping on the day!

Organising everything before your event will reduce the stress of loosing or not being able to find something in the morning. Try to avoid using anything new such as new running shoes or food just in case it makes you uncomfortable and puts you off your game.

Race Day

The day you have been training so hard for has finally arrived! It is ideal to have breakfast 2-3 hours before a race so your body has had enough time to digest and absorb the nutrients and energy. Have a meal that is high in carbs to keep you energised and keep protein, fat, and fibre consumption low. Top up with water before your race to stay hydrated.

Keep your warm-up short. Get your blood pumping and your body ready to run at race pace, but don’t use all of your energy before the race has begun. Believe in yourself and trust your training and try not to get caught up in everyone else’s goals. Focus on your own goal and pace yourself.

Finally, have fun and remember why you are here and why you love running!

 

Keep your eyes out for CrampFix at the Melbourne Marathon.

Event: Melbourne Marathon Festival

Where: Melbourne Cricket Ground

When: October 13, 2019

 

If you have any other tips to prepare yourself before a marathon, we would love to hear them in the comments below!

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Spartan Gold Coast Obstacle Race Event Partner CrampFix

In September 2019, Spartan is bringing the world’s best obstacle race to the Gold Coast!
CrampFix is the Event Partner to ensure you have a cramp-free obstacle race!
Spartan Gold Coast offers the opportunity for all new and returning Spartans to find out what it means #BeMore Spartan this year. Get off the fence and experience firsthand what Spartan racing’s all about by committing to a real challenge at Spartan Gold Coast!
CrampFix and Spartan Gold Coast

CrampFix is an Event Partner with Spartan Gold Coast

Win a FREE entry to Spartan Sprint Gold Coast!!!

Follow our Facebook page and tell us briefly how CrampFix has or will help you to achieve your goals to go into the draw to win!
Look out for the competition announcement post on Facebook!
Entries close 5pm Saturday 31st August 2019. The winner is drawn randomly.
Please note that travel and accommodation costs are not included in the prize. The winner must make their own travel arrangements. Only 1 x Spartan Sprint entry included in the prize.

Do you think you’re not fit enough for Spartan?

Think again because Spartan Gold Coast’s got a race and a challenge for all fitness levels – from beginner to elite! In 2019, Spartan Gold Coast will deliver the 5km Sprint, 21km Beast, Combo, Kids Race, and Hurricane Heat 4 hours. New to Spartan? Smash out the 5k Sprint – a distance that is perfect for Spartan first-timers and has been designed so anyone can run it!

Choose your race category

Racers can choose from three categories; Open, Age Group, or Elite. Whatever path you choose, the Spartan family will be with you every step of the way! See yourself conquer obstacles such as the Olympus, the Spear Throw, the Hercules Hoist, the Rings and many more!

A location known for its glorious weather, hinterland views that that demand to be noticed, and an atmosphere like no other… Spartan Gold Coast never fails to deliver!

Cramping in Obstacle Racing

Cramping can be the thing that ends a race. Particularly during obstacle racing!

Obstacle Race Cramping

Cramping in Obstacle Racing is a common race destroyer!

 

CrampFix will keep the muscle cramps away! Drink just one CrampFix QuickFix Shot sachet to stop cramps immediately! Or if you’ve cramped in previous races use CrampFix preventatively. Drink one QuickFix Shot 5 mins before the start to prevent.

Each QuickFix Shot lasts about 40-60 minutes. If the cramps come back drink another one.

CrampFix in Obstacle Racing

CrampFix really is a lifesaver for cramping!

You can safely consume up to 5 x 20ml Shots per day.

 

SPARTAN GOLD COAST LOCATION

The race will be held at in Numbinah Valley, our famous Gold Cost site, and parking is available! Refer to the Race Schedule below for timings.

Address:  2524 Nerang-Murwillumbah Road Numinbah Valley, QLD 4211

REGISTRATIONS CLOSE 11:59PM 10TH SEPTEMBER AEST

LEARN MORE:

What is Spartan?

OBSTACLES:

A true Spartan must be ready for anything. We never share our full list of obstacles, we will only give you a sneak preview when we release the course maps before the race. However, you can view our obstacle hacks and other videos so that you get a good idea of what you’re in for!
View Obstacle Videos

TRAINING:

The 5k Sprint requires just a base level of fitness, and how hard you go is up to you. However, if you want to challenge yourself in the Elite or Age Group waves, or tackle the Beast or Combo, we do have a couple of resources available to help you take yourself to the next level:
Download Training Guide
View Training Videos
Follow us on Facebook for Weekly Workouts

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Cramp Free Marathon for Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

Cramp Free Marathon for Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

Caleb Noble, Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

 

Caleb Noble –  ran a cramp free marathon and personal best at Noosa Marathon with CrampFix!

Winning the marathon in a time of 2 hours 31 minutes 32 seconds, a personal best and cramp free marathon for Caleb.

The secret weapon Caleb used was CrampFix, an effective new alternative for cramping used by recreational and professional athletes worldwide.

“I drank one Lemon CrampFix Shot just before the race and had an Espresso CrampFix Shot about the 33km mark. My quads normally start to cramp about the 36km mark so this time I was able to hold on until the end”

Caleb has been using CrampFix for over 12 months to help overcome annoying and disruptive muscle cramps in the pool, on the bike and when running. During long training sessions and on race day.

CrampFix can be used by runners of all levels, not just winners!

  • Use on race day to prevent or at time of a cramp
  • Shot sachets fit easily into belts and pockets
  • No mixing or measuring
  • Lasts up to approx 40mins
  • Works within 30 seconds to 2 minutes
  • Max daily 100ml or 5 x Shot sachets
  • 2-3 Shots or 1 Bottle sufficient for a full marathon distance
  • Prevents as well as relieves
  • All natural
  • Gluten free & Vegan
  • Tested for banned substances
  • Made in Australia in our own manufacturing premises

 

CrampFix was developed for professional football players who commonly struggle to stay on the field for an entire game. The players needed a solution and so after 3 years of trialing the CrampFix formula, the brand was launched onto the market so that other athletes could manage their cramps.

Cramp Free Winner Noosa Marathon

Cramp Free Marathon for Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

Caleb Noble, Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

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Causes of Muscle Cramps and How To Get Rid of Them

Potential Causes of Muscle Cramps

What causes muscle cramps and how to get rid of them?

Unfortunately, not too many people can answer this! But we can offer a few insights and theories:

Fatigue

You rarely see cramps at the start of a game or race. However, it is common to see athletes cramp at the end which leads us to believe that fatigue is a likely contributor.

Dehydration & Electrolyte Imbalance

For many years some researchers have long suggested dehydration and electrolyte imbalance (such as decreased salt content) as a cause. But recent reviews have downplayed this theory, as the evidence is mostly observational. This means while there may be an association between dehydration, salt depletion, and cramps, we can’t prove one caused the other.

In these studies, people who were prone to cramps did NOT have differences in hydration or electrolyte content compared to people who were not prone to cramps!

Furthermore, all the muscles in the body would cramp if electrolyte imbalance was implicated. Cramping is usually experienced in actively used muscles.

Salt tablets and magnesium have been commonly used for cramps, but because electrolyte imbalance and dehydration don’t appear to be the cause, their usefulness is debatable.

Other Causes of Muscle Cramps

Other causes of muscle cramps include side effects from some medications, diet or perhaps have a family history of cramping.

Lack of strength and conditioning may also play a role in exercise-related muscle cramps.

How to Get Rid of Muscle Cramps

Science is now proving there is a fast way of getting rid of muscle cramps

The latest science in relation to getting rid of muscle cramps relates more to a neurological connection. Particularly in terms of rapid relief during activity. Studies conducted with professional rugby players have shown that despite hydration, strength, conditioning & nutrition being monitored, cramping can often still occur. Hence the effectiveness of using a product that stimulates a neural response.  Products like CrampFix are able to quickly activate sensory nerves in the mouth, triggering the overactive nerve signals to release the cramp – quickly.

Swallowing and digesting is not required! Cramps disappear just by swirling the liquid around the mouth and discarding it! This is how to get rid of cramps quick enough to stay in the game.

Cyclists commonly suffer muscle cramps.

 

https://coach.nine.com.au/fitness/muscle-cramps/1f96eff6-7968-436e-b8af-4410634827e8

https://theconversation.com/health-check-why-do-we-get-muscle-cramps-93493

Discover how you can get rid of muscle cramps fast!

 

 

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What causes cramping?

This insightful article explains how hydration cannot be the issue:

“One of the most common reasons for failure in the marathon is suffering from muscle cramping. As many seasoned marathon veterans know, these muscle cramps can be one of most frustrating reasons for a poor performance. Typically, when you suffer from a cramp, everything else is going pretty well. The pace feels easy, you’ve got plenty of energy, and a new PR seems almost inevitable. Then bang! Your calf cramps and it takes everything you have just to crawl to the finish.

As we’ve been taught to do from the billions of dollars funneled into the sports drink market every year, most runners blame a lack of fluid or electrolyte intake for their untimely cramp. So, for their next marathon they work on drinking more often.

Unfortunately, as many marathoners know, this rarely solves the problem. It seems no matter how often we drink or how precisely we try to optimize our electrolyte levels, the same darn calf cramp returns late in the race.

This is because your marathon cramping isn’t likely a hydration or electrolyte issue at all. Rather, the problem is what we call a “muscle overloading” or a fatigue cramp. This occurs when the neural mechanisms that are supposed to inhibit muscle contraction are depressed and the chemical and electrical synapses that fire the muscle fibres are enhanced. The result is an intense, sustained involuntary muscle contraction”.

*How to beat marathon muscle cramps by Jeff Gaudette / October 24, 2018

Products such as CrampFix are able to interrupt these enhanced electrical synapses that are firing the muscle fibres. CrampFix was developed with professional Rugby players who commonly suffer cramps during a game. After three years of trialling the formula it was concluded that it can be used at the time of cramp AND/OR prior to getting a cramp. After drinking or swirling the product the response is almost immediate due to the neurological activation.

Studies by Dr Kevin Miller were considered as a basis for the idea of treating cramps in this way. Dr Miller conducted several studies where athletes were induced electrically with cramp after which they were fed varying formulas. Despite not being able to find out why athletes cramp, he was able to link successful treatment to consumption of low ph formulas.

If you are worried about the dreaded cramp, why not give CrampFix a try? It’s being used around the world by professional and recreational athletes across many different sports. Stay Brave, Stay Strong, Stay Focused, Stay Cramp Free!!

CrampFix is available in multi use Fliptop lid bottles and single shot sachets.

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