cramp Archives - Crampfix

Cramp Free Marathon for Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

Cramp Free Marathon for Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

Caleb Noble, Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

 

Caleb Noble –  ran a cramp free marathon and personal best at Noosa Marathon with CrampFix!

Winning the marathon in a time of 2 hours 31 minutes 32 seconds, a personal best and cramp free marathon for Caleb.

The secret weapon Caleb used was CrampFix, an effective new alternative for cramping used by recreational and professional athletes worldwide.

“I drank one Lemon CrampFix Shot just before the race and had an Espresso CrampFix Shot about the 33km mark. My quads normally start to cramp about the 36km mark so this time I was able to hold on until the end”

Caleb has been using CrampFix for over 12 months to help overcome annoying and disruptive muscle cramps in the pool, on the bike and when running. During long training sessions and on race day.

CrampFix can be used by runners of all levels, not just winners!

  • Use on race day to prevent or at time of a cramp
  • Shot sachets fit easily into belts and pockets
  • No mixing or measuring
  • Lasts up to approx 40mins
  • Works within 30 seconds to 2 minutes
  • Max daily 100ml or 5 x Shot sachets
  • 2-3 Shots or 1 Bottle sufficient for a full marathon distance
  • Prevents as well as relieves
  • All natural
  • Gluten free & Vegan
  • Tested for banned substances
  • Made in Australia in our own manufacturing premises

 

CrampFix was developed for professional football players who commonly struggle to stay on the field for an entire game. The players needed a solution and so after 3 years of trialing the CrampFix formula, the brand was launched onto the market so that other athletes could manage their cramps.

Cramp Free Winner Noosa Marathon

Cramp Free Marathon for Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

Caleb Noble, Winner of Noosa Marathon 2019

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Causes of Muscle Cramps and How To Get Rid of Them

Potential Causes of Muscle Cramps

What causes muscle cramps and how to get rid of them?

Unfortunately, not too many people can answer this! But we can offer a few insights and theories:

Fatigue

You rarely see cramps at the start of a game or race. However, it is common to see athletes cramp at the end which leads us to believe that fatigue is a likely contributor.

Dehydration & Electrolyte Imbalance

For many years some researchers have long suggested dehydration and electrolyte imbalance (such as decreased salt content) as a cause. But recent reviews have downplayed this theory, as the evidence is mostly observational. This means while there may be an association between dehydration, salt depletion, and cramps, we can’t prove one caused the other.

In these studies, people who were prone to cramps did NOT have differences in hydration or electrolyte content compared to people who were not prone to cramps!

Furthermore, all the muscles in the body would cramp if electrolyte imbalance was implicated. Cramping is usually experienced in actively used muscles.

Salt tablets and magnesium have been commonly used for cramps, but because electrolyte imbalance and dehydration don’t appear to be the cause, their usefulness is debatable.

Other Causes of Muscle Cramps

Other causes of muscle cramps include side effects from some medications, diet or perhaps have a family history of cramping.

Lack of strength and conditioning may also play a role in exercise-related muscle cramps.

How to Get Rid of Muscle Cramps

Science is now proving there is a fast way of getting rid of muscle cramps

The latest science in relation to getting rid of muscle cramps relates more to a neurological connection. Particularly in terms of rapid relief during activity. Studies conducted with professional rugby players have shown that despite hydration, strength, conditioning & nutrition being monitored, cramping can often still occur. Hence the effectiveness of using a product that stimulates a neural response.  Products like CrampFix are able to quickly activate sensory nerves in the mouth, triggering the overactive nerve signals to release the cramp – quickly.

Swallowing and digesting is not required! Cramps disappear just by swirling the liquid around the mouth and discarding it! This is how to get rid of cramps quick enough to stay in the game.

Cyclists commonly suffer muscle cramps.

 

https://coach.nine.com.au/fitness/muscle-cramps/1f96eff6-7968-436e-b8af-4410634827e8

https://theconversation.com/health-check-why-do-we-get-muscle-cramps-93493

Discover how you can get rid of muscle cramps fast!

 

 

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Triathlon Leg Cramps CrampFix “Be it training or racing, I’m happy they work for me!”

If you’re wanting to use CrampFix in your next triathlon but aren’t sure just how to … read this race report by Ironman Triathlete & Ultraman Kristin Trappitt.

“For the Ironman 70.3 Geelong I took an Espresso CrampFix pre swimming as I can get quad and calf cramps during the swim. Not on Sunday thankfully!.

On the ride I had a Raspberry CrampFix at 20km and again at 65km. These help me as I have tight calves and it helps me stay looser into the run.

This was a tough run, especially with the warming conditions. A Lemon CrampFix at the end of Lap 1 of the run and NO CRAMPING issues at all during the day!

I continue to enjoy the benefits of CrampFix with all my extended days. Be it training or racing and I’m happy they work for me”

December 2018. Photo of Kristin Trappitt and Rod Miller.

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Oh, cramp!

A muscle cramp can stop you in your tracks–but with science on your side, you can fix it fast.

Your Facebook post about a midrace muscle cramp now has 32 unsolicited comments: Eat bananas! Salt tablets! Mustard! While the peanut gallery means well, the advice they’re dishing out may just be nuts. In fact, even experts can’t say with certainty what causes exercised-induced muscle cramps.

“Scientists have theories, but it’s hard to do research on cramps because they’re unpredictable and spontaneous,” says Kevin C. Miller, Ph.D., an associate professor of athletic training at Central Michigan University and devoted cramp researcher. In fact, one of Miller’s early career tasks was to devise a humane way to induce cramps. (The process he came up with involves electro currents and students’ big toes. He swears it’s not too painful.)

But even in a lab, multiple variables can be at play when a cramp occurs. “When I exercise, I lose sodium, I become dehydrated, and I become fatigued,” Miller says. “The problem is all those things are happening at the same time, which makes it difficult to say definitively what’s responsible.”

What experts do know is that many common treatments have been proven ineffective. Which means it’s time to rethink your treatment regimen. 

Cramp Culprits
Experts weigh in on two common theories.

Dehydration and Electrolyte Loss: The best-known theory is also the one with the least amount of scientific support. Timothy Noakes, M.D., Ph.D., D.Sc., a renowned exercise scientist from the University of Cape Town, calls the studies that link cramps to sodium loss and dehydration “bogus science.” In 2004, he studied the electrolyte levels of 43 ultramarathoners. Blood tests after a race showed no significant differences in blood sodium or magnesium concentrations between those who had and hadn’t cramped.

There were also no differences in body weight, plasma volume, or blood volume between the two groups, showing that dehydration had no real effect. Miller agrees: If dehydration alone could cause a muscle cramp, he theorizes that you could seize up in saunas or hot tubs, or even just walking around on hot days.

Muscle Fatigue: Dehydration, however, could expedite muscle fatigue, and that is what Miller believes is a likely cause of cramps. In that ultramarathoner study, 100 percent of the runners who cramped did so in either the last half of or right after the race. Anecdotally, this theory holds up: Most people who cramp seem to be covering longer distances; cramps seem more common at mile 20 of a marathon than, say, mile two of a 5K.

Additionally, speedier runners seem to be at higher risk. Two 2011 studies found that fast-paced ultramarathoners and triathletes had more cramps than their slower counterparts.

Preventive Steps
Here are the best strategies for avoiding spasms.

Run Long: Guarding against muscle fatigue is key, so don’t take any shortcuts in training. “Train more, do longer distances,” says Dr. Noakes, a former ultramarathoner. “You have to adapt to the distance you want to race.”

Strength Train:  Miller recommends plyometrics (check out this article for an explosive plyometric workout)—explosive exercises that may improve the endurance of the receptors that are thought to misfire and cause cramps.

Pace Properly: If you trained logging 10-minute miles and you start racing 8:45-minute miles, your muscles won’t be prepared for that effort, and you’ll risk cramping, Miller says.

Keep Track: Miller thinks cramps are often caused by the perfect confluence of factors. “If you tend to cramp up at 20 miles, write that down,” he says. “Then write down the conditions: Was it hot? Was it humid? How much did you drink? What was your nutrition like the night before? Were you acclimated to the heat?” Track patterns over time, and you may be able to figure out exactly what makes you cramp.

Or – why not try a CrampFix QuickFix Shot until you figure things out?! even carry one with you for emergencies! You never know what can happen out there right?

One CrampFix Shot will get rid of any cramps in about a minute, so you can be back in the race. You can even stay in the race by using the product preventively. Consume it before the race or before the sticky stage and get through without cramping! Race cramp free.

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